Some day, somewhere in the net there was iBlog. It was about everything and nothing. A few persons was reading it, some of them maybe even liked it. But I am not interested in writing about myself anymore. This blog will be about Project Management. Less personal, but in fact it will be my personal tool: to not forget what I have learnt. And what I ll learn in future.
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sobota, 22 sierpnia 2009

Management styles might be divided, at least for my own purpose, into two basic categories.

The first category is black/white style. A black/white manager usually manages in the finger-pointing way: most of the time he is engaged in finding guilty (black) persons. You can either do something well (white) or wrong (black). Of course in the constantly-changing business situation this means that white results will be found as black tommorow.

The second style will be... you'd say: aah! the shadows-of-gray style! I'd say: no! - shadows-of-gray is just a slight divergence of black/white style, used by managers having the main goal of self-protection (i.e. job protection). They just use shadows of gray, in a more diplomative and political way, but the effect is the same.

The second style is more colorful: green/yellow/red. This style addresses issues, problems, risks and business situation changes, not guilts of the colleagues. The situation may be green. It doesn't mean that somebody done something right or wrong. The situation may be yellow - this indicates that some escalation might be needed and corrective actions must be taken. The situation may be also red - this indicates that escalation is a must, and resolution of the risk, issue or problem is beyond reporter's management level capabilities. None of these colors say anything about who's fault it is, who's bad, who's good. It's just plain, objective (although usually qualitative, not quantitative) report of current business situation.

Look around you and try to divide managers to those two categories. Beware of the black/white ones because in case of difficult situation, they will, sooner or later, try to fingerpoint you black. If you see such a threat you can easily win the black/white fight, even in Taylor-style managed organizations, with just bringing buckets of red, green and yellow paint. Just bring them early enough, don't wait until the situation is really red.